Ladies Guide to History: The Woman Who Would Be King by Kara Cooney

Who Was She?

Hatshepsut was a woman who had the courage to take power and the fortitude to hold that power in a society where women in power went against the status quo. Because she went against the status quo she was often thought of as power hungry, and that she stole power from the true (male) owner of that power. The author, Kara Cooney, of The Woman Who Would Be King goes a long way in proving Hatshepsut’s story was different than what was previously believed. Continue reading


The Ladies Guide to History: The Hello Girls: America’s First Women Soldier by Elizabeth Cobbs


Who Were They?

When the United States Army entered WWI they soon realized that they had a problem. They needed experienced operators to run the switchboards that had become the primary source of communication between commanders in the field while in Europe. Army commanders realized that the enlisted men they had trained to do the job just weren’t able to gain the experience and efficiency that they needed. So the higher-ups decided to recruit some of the women who did it professionally. Continue reading

The Ladies Guide to History: Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley

Romantic Outlaws
Romantic Outlaws relates the stories of a mother and a daughter: Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley. Both were inspiring woman who chose not to let their lives be ruled by the arbitrary rules that society created.

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The Ladies Guide to History: Marian Anderson


Since February is Black History Month I decided to pick up a book on Marian Anderson, one of my favorite civil rights icons, A Sound of Freedom by Raymond Arsenault. The book I picked up tells the story of April 9th, 1939 when Marian Anderson sang on the Lincoln Memorial steps after being denied the ability to the perform at Constitution Hall because of a policy that refused black performers the ability to perform on Constitution Hall’s Stage. Because of this outright racist decision she sang on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in an open air concert that was free to everybody and became a civil rights icon.

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