Ladies Guide to History: Dearest Friend: A Life of Abigail Adams by Lynne Withey

 

 

“I desire you would Remember the Ladies… Remember all Men would be tyrants if they could. If perticuliar care and attention is not paid to the Laidies we are determined to forment a Rebelion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any Laws in which we have no voice, or Repersentation.”

– Abigail Adams

Abigail Adams is often thought of one of the United States first feminists and in some respects, this is certainly true. She believed that women were not, as often thought, the intellectual inferiors to men and many of her actions back this up. In Dearest Friend: A Life of Abigail Adams Lynne Withey discusses Abigail’s life and her contributions to the newly formed United States and to feminism.  Continue reading

Advertisements

Book Review: The Dog Master

IMG_1612

The Dog Master by W. Bruce Cameron tells the story of the first dog (fictionalized of course). It’s the story of how a wolf came to see a human as part of its pack and how a human was able to stop seeing a wolf as a dangerous predator and see him as a friend. The Dog Master has multiple perspectives that intersect to tell of the circumstances that made it possible for human and wolf to befriend each other and learn to rely on each other for survival. Continue reading

The Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant Review, Day 21: Blue #30DaysofReadathon

IMG_1555

“Much of the time, I am sorry to say, was devoted to novels…”

U.S. Grant

Personal Memoirs (pg. 15)

For my blue book pick, I chose The Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant. These memoirs were written by Grant as he was dying of throat cancer, as a way for Grant to provide for his family. Grant’s memoirs primarily cover Grant’s military career and ends at the end of the Civil War. Grant describes his experiences in Mexico during the Mexican American war and of his incredible rise to four-star general during the Civil War. Continue reading

Day 22: Cozy #30DaysofReadathon Dreamer’s Pool

IMG_1554

Fall always seems like it’s the time to get cozy. Personally, I love fall. I love the leaves changing colors, how the temperature gets colder and that we get to wear cozy sweaters, not to mention that the holidays are approaching. But another thing that always screams fall to me is reading a good book curled up under a blanket. So for today’s prompt, I chose Dreamer’s Pool by Juliet Marillier one of my absolutely favorite books. Continue reading

Day 24: Drinks #30DaysOfReadathon and Just One Damned Thing After Another by Jodi Taylor Review

IMG_1553

For Day 24: Drink I chose to couple tea with Science fiction especially because there is so much tea drinking within this book.

Just One Damned Thing After Another by Jodi Taylor centers around the main character Madeline Maxwell, or Max, a historian who specializes Ancient History. She is recruited by the St. Mary’s Institute and after a vigorous training program, she is able to join the other “historians” and travel through time to different historically and scientifically significant points in time. She overcomes and solves one problem after another with wonderful snark. Max has a romantic interest who is equally as interesting and has some secrets of his own and we get to see their relationship develop.

As a primarily fantasy reader I decided to stick my toe into the pool of science fiction. and picked Just One Damned Thing After Another on a whim. After reading it I was sold. (I love taking a chance on a book and have it turn out to be wonderful.) I absolutely loved this book. It was hilarious and heartbreaking and actually made me laugh out loud a relatively rare occurrence. This book hit the spot like a good cup of tea. Something I think Max, the main character, would relate to.

Overall, I loved this book. I thought it was hilarious and told an interesting story. I think that this book would be great for beginning science fiction readers. There were no heavy technical explanations of how time travel worked and I felt like this was a good thing. Many of the historical events were fairly accurate and sometimes incredibly moving. I gave this book 5/5 stars.