Mini Review: The Soul of An Octopus by Sy Montgomery

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I recently read The Soul of an Octopus: A Surprising Exploration into the Wonder of Consciousness  by Sy Montgomery and I really enjoyed it. It was an insightful look at the backstage at an aquarium and at the octopus(es) that so intrigued the author. While not being too terribly fact heavy this book makes you question what your preconceived notions of the animals that exist around. The author makes you question whether the information that you learned in science truly encompasses everything about the animal whether or not they are capable of having personalities or even souls. Watching the author’s relationship with the different octopuses that she interacts with whether in the wild or in the aquarium leads her to question the assumed knowledge about the animal’s intelligence. I really enjoyed this book, it was fascinating getting a behind the scenes glimpse of an aquarium and the people who devote their time and energy to working with those animals. This book also contained an emotional account of people bonding over a shared passion and was a fantastic memoir of an authors experiences in working alongside people who are passionate in what they do.

The only disappointment with this book was in the lack of facts while there was some information you learned alongside the author I was wishing for a bit more information. I would not recommend this book to anyone who was looking for a book that delves deep into the science of the octopus because I felt that this book was more a memoir of the author’s experience in researching octopuses. Ultimately I did enjoy this book but I wished this book had more facts about the octopuses instead of the author.

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Book Review: Ghostland: An American History in Haunted Places by Colin Dickey

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Let me start this review by saying that this book was a massive disappointment for me. I read this in October looking for a creepy Halloween read. I thought this book was going to be the creepy ghost stories I was looking for, but it turned out to be anything but.

What its All About

Ghostland: An American History in Haunted Places by Colin Dickey premise is as it says, sharing ghost stories from across the country. The author’s thesis is ghost stories share more about the people and society telling the story than of those whose stories are being shared. That ghost stories can highlight our faults by defining something that went against societal norms as scary or neglecting what we as a society are ashamed of entirely. In many ways, these stories showcase the things that people are ashamed of. The author argues that ghost stories can reflect many of the contemporary society’s mores by what the society found or finds repellant. In many cases, something that goes against the society’s social mores leads to the rumors of something otherworldly happening and therefore the belief in the haunting.

My Thoughts on the Book

This book did start out well. The first couple of chapters were exactly as advertised. Each chapter is supposed to tell the story of a local haunting and then the author tries to explain how this reflected the culture of the local area. The first couple chapters were exactly as advertised. A local haunting is told and the author explained how that reflected the time period and the culture that the people lived in. But after a while, the author kept coming back to the same theme. How each haunting is flawed and how it can be debunked. This “openminded” author debunks every single haunting. It led me to believe that he picked the hauntings that were easily debunked. In fact, most hauntings seemed to be debunked with little to no extensive research on behalf of the author. It made me think the author was picking and choosing hauntings that fit within his overarching theme and that were easily debunked.

The author’s tone is condescending towards his audience and he feels the need to explain exactly how each haunting fits into his overarching theme of hauntings showcases societies flaws. He never lets the audience make the connection or the leap of logic. He pedantically explains what exactly the flaw of society is and then how the haunting showcases this, even when the connection is extremely obvious as the conditions within the sanitarium and prison. I think it would have been more interesting if the author had shared the details and then let the audience make the conclusion for themselves. However, at times I feel like the author had to explain so in depth because the actual research seemed to be lacking.

There are several chapters where the author discusses how in many different parts of America the ghosts are primarily white people to exclude stories that highlight the abuse and degrading conditions of enslaved people which can make people feel uncomfortable. However, he does include several hauntings that are of people who were enslaved. But these hauntings have also been contorted so that the slaves are portrayed as villains. I think it would have been more interesting if he had included one of these stories to illustrate his point but also included some of the stories he mentioned briefly of the ghost stories recorded by the slaves themselves.

As I alluded to earlier I think this book was not as researched as much as it could have been. There were several errors or rather omissions that showed that the author did not do extensive research on the area. He made several location errors such as describing Monticello as in the city of Richmond. (this might be because I live in the general area). The chapter about Shiloh also illustrates the fact that the author could have done much more research, the chapter on Shiloh is extremely vague. He does not include any specifics about the ghost stories at all, just mentions that there were a few soldiers supposedly haunting the battlefield. He does not mention anything about the battle at all, which cheapened the whole chapter. The reason I love reading ghost stories is being able to feel an emotional connection with the subjects of the story. Shiloh was the battle where the Union army was caught by surprise and suffered massive amounts of casualties on that first day. The massive amount of casualties that were caught by surprise, in particular, should have led to an emotional and evocative ghost story, but I don’t think the author did the research in order to find that out.

Ladies Guide to History: Dearest Friend: A Life of Abigail Adams by Lynne Withey

 

 

“I desire you would Remember the Ladies… Remember all Men would be tyrants if they could. If perticuliar care and attention is not paid to the Laidies we are determined to forment a Rebelion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any Laws in which we have no voice, or Repersentation.”

– Abigail Adams

Abigail Adams is often thought of one of the United States first feminists and in some respects, this is certainly true. She believed that women were not, as often thought, the intellectual inferiors to men and many of her actions back this up. In Dearest Friend: A Life of Abigail Adams Lynne Withey discusses Abigail’s life and her contributions to the newly formed United States and to feminism.  Continue reading

Book Review: The Dog Master

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The Dog Master by W. Bruce Cameron tells the story of the first dog (fictionalized of course). It’s the story of how a wolf came to see a human as part of its pack and how a human was able to stop seeing a wolf as a dangerous predator and see him as a friend. The Dog Master has multiple perspectives that intersect to tell of the circumstances that made it possible for human and wolf to befriend each other and learn to rely on each other for survival. Continue reading

The Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant Review, Day 21: Blue #30DaysofReadathon

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“Much of the time, I am sorry to say, was devoted to novels…”

U.S. Grant

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For my blue book pick, I chose The Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant. These memoirs were written by Grant as he was dying of throat cancer, as a way for Grant to provide for his family. Grant’s memoirs primarily cover Grant’s military career and ends at the end of the Civil War. Grant describes his experiences in Mexico during the Mexican American war and of his incredible rise to four-star general during the Civil War. Continue reading

Day 22: Cozy #30DaysofReadathon Dreamer’s Pool

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Fall always seems like it’s the time to get cozy. Personally, I love fall. I love the leaves changing colors, how the temperature gets colder and that we get to wear cozy sweaters, not to mention that the holidays are approaching. But another thing that always screams fall to me is reading a good book curled up under a blanket. So for today’s prompt, I chose Dreamer’s Pool by Juliet Marillier one of my absolutely favorite books. Continue reading

Day 24: Drinks #30DaysOfReadathon and Just One Damned Thing After Another by Jodi Taylor Review

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For Day 24: Drink I chose to couple tea with Science fiction especially because there is so much tea drinking within this book.

Just One Damned Thing After Another by Jodi Taylor centers around the main character Madeline Maxwell, or Max, a historian who specializes Ancient History. She is recruited by the St. Mary’s Institute and after a vigorous training program, she is able to join the other “historians” and travel through time to different historically and scientifically significant points in time. She overcomes and solves one problem after another with wonderful snark. Max has a romantic interest who is equally as interesting and has some secrets of his own and we get to see their relationship develop.

As a primarily fantasy reader I decided to stick my toe into the pool of science fiction. and picked Just One Damned Thing After Another on a whim. After reading it I was sold. (I love taking a chance on a book and have it turn out to be wonderful.) I absolutely loved this book. It was hilarious and heartbreaking and actually made me laugh out loud a relatively rare occurrence. This book hit the spot like a good cup of tea. Something I think Max, the main character, would relate to.

Overall, I loved this book. I thought it was hilarious and told an interesting story. I think that this book would be great for beginning science fiction readers. There were no heavy technical explanations of how time travel worked and I felt like this was a good thing. Many of the historical events were fairly accurate and sometimes incredibly moving. I gave this book 5/5 stars.