Dewey’s 24 Hour Readathon: An Update

It’s over halfway into the readathon and so I’ve decided to update you on my achievements. There haven’t been that many lol. I’ve read a total of one book and around 394 pages. Now onto more reading and my second book.

Advertisements

Dewey’s 24 Hour Readathon is Here!

Today’s the day!! Dewey’s 24 Hour Readathon is happening now and after getting a bunch of chores out of the way, I’m ready to start! I going to be starting with Elizabeth Goudge’s A City of Bells and hopefully will finish it. Also on my TBR is Thornyhold by Mary Stewart and Murder at the Brightwell by Ashley Weaver.

18C03685-BC3C-4BB8-ACA7-3BB47A2A7AD8.jpeg

Halloween Movie to Book Matchup

I don’t know about you, but I am super excited for Halloween this year. To start celebrating I decided to pair a Halloween movie with a book.

It’s the Great Pumpkin Charlie Brown

1A7D3F82-6F57-4E8F-B965-D44277DAD8B4

This movie is a Halloween classic and to pair with it, I think a great match is another classic one that is as lighthearted, and fun, as well as uplifting. So to pair with It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown is the Father Brown Stories by G.K. Chesterton


The Exorcist

IMG_0904

The Exorcist is a horror classic, scary no matter what time of year you watch it. My match for this movie is another classic the Screwtape Letters by C.S. Lewis. This is an epistolary novel of letters from Uncle to Nephew demons. These letters describe how demons influence a person’s decisions, leading them to Hell. Both the exorcist and the Screwtape Letters deal with demons. The Exorcist describes a possession while the Screwtape Letters demonstrate how a person’s ideas and thoughts can be subtly influenced by demons. Which is scarier, its hard to say…


Addams Family

IMG_0909

The third movie I chose is the Addams Family, a movie that takes classic horror and gothic tropes and turns them on their head in hilarious ways. A great book that captures some of the same absurdity is Murder Must Advertise by Dorothy Sayers. (Yes, I had to include a Dorothy Sayers novel, because she is fantastic.) The mundane office suddenly becomes the scene of a murder. This book is filled with humor, primarily from our protagonist, Peter Wimsey. Murder Must Advertise is definitely one of my favorite books in the series. I think you could read any of the Peter Wimsey mysteries out of order. However, you should read the ones with Harriet Vane in order.


Hocus Pocus

41HXxSi9B4L

Hocus Pocus has become something of a modern classic, for good reason, it has everything you could want in it: witches, romance, a mystery to solve, and a great musical number. While I can’t promise you a great musical number in Murder as a Fine Art by David Morrell, it has everything else. It follows the author of Confessions of an Opium Eater, Thomas De Quincey and his daughter as they try to solve the murders De Quincey is being accused of. Murders that are the recreations of a series of famous murders De Quincey once wrote about.


Halloweentown

6FC02BA3-A8C3-402E-896E-B50602CE116E

loweentown is another movie that revels in its eccentricies and I think a wonderful pairing for this movie, would be Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie. This is a book whose strength lies in the absurdity of its main character Hercule Poirot.

If you like Fringe then you Should Read…

IMG_0711.JPG

Recently, I’ve found myself rewatching the TV show Fringe and loving it. Albeit, a little quirky, it is a wonderfully engrossing show with a fantastic cast of characters. The relationship between the characters and the weird cases is what makes this show so good. If you like Fringe and want to read a book that has a similar vibe then check out these books!

1. Just One Damned Thing After Another by Jodi Taylor

IMG_0759.JPG

If Dr. Walter Bishop could invent a way to get from one universe to another, then time travel is should be next on his list. This book explores the idea of what would happen if historians and scientists had the ability to time travel. Yep, you guessed it chaos, mayhem, and hilarity ensue. The characters are just as zany in Fringe, although, in Just One Damned Thing After Another, they drink more tea.


2. Flu by Gina Kolata

IMG_0725.JPG

In some ways, it’s fascinating learning about the terrifying possibilities the advances in science can create. But not all the terrifying possibilities are man-made. The flu is something in most cases is fairly innocuous, especially to people in the prime of their lives and health. But the 1918 flu turned all that on its head. It seemed to be particularly affecting to the strong and healthy, especially, those kept together in close quarters like those in the military. Flu provides a fascinating, but also an absolutely terrifying portrayal of how this disease rocked the US.


3. Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle

img_0760

In every episode of Fringe is a mystery to solve. If you enjoy this aspect of the show, then a great read is the original sleuth himself, Sherlock Holmes. Sherlock uses the clues around him to solve the case just like the Fringe team does, although in their case the mysteries tend to be a little weirder.


There you go, three books or short story collections you’ll like if you liked Fringe. Let me know what you think. Have you seen Fringe? What are your recommendations?

Boo To You Readathon TBR

IMG_0609.JPG

For the month of October, BookishPrincess is hosting a Disney themed readathon, the Boo to You Readathon. I’ll link her announcement video here. Although, its been a while since I’ve been to Disney World I am super excited to participate. Here is a list of the books I’ve chosen for each of the challenges Emma created for the readathon. Continue reading

Dewey’s 24 Hour Readathon TBR

IMG_2122

Dewey’s 24 Hour Readathon is happening! I always love participating every time its held and this time is no different. I don’t know how much time I will in actuality be spending reading but I plan to devote a large portion of the day to the readathon.

This time I plan to read…

  1. Lullaby by Chuck Palahniuk
  2. The Story of Egypt by Joann Fletcher
  3. The Last Days of Magic by Mark Tompkins